LifeVantage Review-Is It Legit or A Scam?

screen shot picture of the LifeVantage website

Introduction:

If you are looking for a good online money-making opportunity,
there are plenty of them out there. And considering that we are experts in this department, we can be able to easily tell you the ones that are Legit, from the ones that are Scams. We know how you want to make a few extra bucks as part of a side hustle, or eventually working online full-time, and saying goodbye to that 9 to 5 grind. But that doesn’t come easy.

There are some shady crazys out there that will overpromise and underdeliver. One opportunity that will be taking a look at today is “LifeVantage”. Is this a legit way to make money? Or is it another one of those things you need to steer clear from. Let’s dive in and tell you what we’ve dug up.

What Is LifeVantage?:

“LifeVantage” is a multi-level marketing company or MLM for short. In the online entrepreneurial world, a lot of folks down talk the whole MLM idea (and probably for a few good reasons). The company was founded in 2003 by Darren Jensen and focuses on the health and wellness niche. Their target market typically focuses on women, mothers, and housewives.

In the first two years of their existence, “LifeVantage” began selling it’s products on the mainstream markets. However, that all changed in 2005 when they hopped on the network marketing bandwagon. Since becoming an MLM, they have become one of the more well-known network marketing companies, along with “Amway” and “Herbalife”. They both are “LifeVantage’s” major competitors. 

“LifeVantage” claim that their products are backed by science, and focuse on people who want to live a healthy lifestyle. However after doing some deep digging, their message doesn’t seem to connect with us. Plus they’re message seems to be filled with all kinds of hard to understand science bull crap. One such focus that “LifeVantage” seems to tackle, is aging (as intended in one of their products known as “Nad Synergizer”). 

How Does LifeVantage Work?:

If you are not familiar with the concept of MLMs, let us give you a crash course on how they work. Let’s say for instance you get recruited by someone who “works” for the company. You sign up as a representative that’ll also be selling the same products. Now your considered a “downline member” to your “upline”, (which is the person who recruited/reffered you).

When you make a sale, a percentage of your profits is paid to your upline, while you keep the leftovers. The amount you earn will grow, when you recruit more people to join under you. From there, you become your own upline. You then start to get paid more, as well as the person above you.

With “LifeVantage”, you have to spend $50 on what is known as the “starter kit”. However, you’ll need to spend more on other products, if you decide you want to try the other product’s out (which are not included). There are also product packages, which all have their own price tag. For example, a silver package will cost you roughly $350. But the little carrot that dangles in front of you, is the promise of a higher percentage you get for saving your money.

Here’s where things get really interesting. Not only will you be paying money regularly for products, but you’re also required to meet a quota in order to stay “active”. This is a standard operating procedure for any MLM in existence. And it will be hard for anyone to keep up. Especially for those who have never done muli-level marketing before. 

How Much Does LifeVantage Claim You Can Make?:

From what we’ve learned about MLM companies, the reality is that you won’t make a lot of money, or earn a steady long term income. Eventually someone of authority will discover it, and shut it down. But the most common way you’ll earn money with “LifeVantage”, is by direct selling and recruiting/building your downline. The more people you have in your downline, the more money you’ll get paid. 

How much money you earn will depend on how much work you’re putting in. Some claim to be earning somewhere around $200 a month. However, those who have experienced working with “LifeVantage” have reported making less than that. And that’s typical of anyone doing an MLM. You might make money, but you’d be lucky to make a nice amount of profit. 

The Red Flags of “LifeVantage”-What We Know:

There really is no pro that we can think of, other than the fact that it is a publically traded company. But we were able to root out a few red flags. Here’s what we have learned:

They are facing lawsuits: As of 2018, “LifeVantage” is facing a lawsuit that deems the company a “pyramid” scheme. This might be the norm considering there are dozens of MLM companies that are currently facing the same fate, or in the process of going thru the same thing. Any company that is facing some kind of litigation will obviously not be the place to do business. 

They are not BBB Accredited: Here’s the thing about BBB ratings. We’ve learned recently to take them with a grain of salt, given the number of false claims. They are not BBB accredited. And even if they were, it would be wise to double-check. Take note of this when you are dealing with anyone offering an online money-making opportunity. Claiming to have a BBB positive rating is easy to do, compared to spending money on getting someone to do a fake positive review.

A lot of people have seen little success: Let’s face it — a lot of people failed to make a steady, long term income with MLM programs. And “LifeVantage” is no different in that regard. Of course lots of people with little experience, say that they are not great at selling door-to-door or face-to-face, with people they know. Sales itself might be a daunting task. But when it comes to Multi-level Marketing ,it’s a whole different animal that we can discuss in another article. 

Advice Regarding MLMs:

We can say with certainty that multi-level marketing isn’t a good way to make money online (and for a good reason). Even if you do have some sales experience and can sell product’s like crazy, we can think of and recommend other opportunities that are better. With the rising anti-sentiment regarding MLMs, you are wise to keep away from them. You have no idea how many stories we’ve heard concerning what MLM programs have done to people, as far as personal relationships are concerned. 

Also if someone tries to privately message you out of the blue, concerning a “business opportunity”, they may be trying to recruit you to join a MLM program. You’d be smart to simply ignore the message, or kindly say “no thanks”. But be warned, these people might be persistent and annoyingly pushy. 

A screen shot picture of the LifeVantage website and a white man kicking a soccer ball

My Final Verdict for LifeVantage:-

Just because the cons outweigh the pros, doesn’t make this a scam. However, we advise you to steer clear of “LifeVantage”, and consider other alternative options. We believe that you can be successful in making money online. And we know of several opportunities , you might enjoy. If you seem to be stuck, don’t be afraid to reach out to us. We’ll steer you in the right direction, and make a few suggestions. 

So, would you happen to have something to say about this,”LifeVantage” program? Maybe something to add? Do you believe this business is a scam or legit? Is they’re any questions you might have concerning my “LifeVantage” review? Maybe something I didn’t mention?

If so, cool! Leave your comments or concerns below in the comment section, and I would be more than happy to respond back. Thank you again for reading my post, and good luck with all your success online..

Were you looking for my top, legit work online recommendation instead?

Click here To Read My # 1 Recommendation!

Also, if you enjoyed reading and educating yourself on “LifeVantage”, please don’t limit yourself. Feel free to read and learn (from one of my other reviews), “all about” a different scam online business that should be avoided like:

Complete Profit (Scam) Review

Simple Income Strategies (Scam) Review

Empowr (Scam) Review

My Home Job Search (Scam) Review

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And so much more..

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